Endurance Sport Success

We must remember that success in endurance sport is a multi-faceted area. Similar to motor racing, if it was just the engine it would be simple. It isn’t. It’s engine, suspension, aerodynamics, tyres, hydration, driver skill, mental approach, race tactics etc etc

Time trials aren’t an exercise in going as fast as you can and trying to PB. They are an exercise in being able to practice going fast and thinking about how we perform across the spectrum. How was my skill? What was my mental approach like? What equipment did I use and how did it perform?

Again – don’t just think success is all about the size of the engine. There’s so much more to it than that !

Deliberate Practice

I run a lot of sessions as a coach and deliver many more for you to get done away from the coaches eye. 

I believe this could be one of the most important pieces of advice i have given for a while and believe that its critical to your success as an athlete. Get this right and a lot will fall into place. 

Training isn’t a race – its an opportunity to prepare for a race. Unfortunately I am seeing athletes still judging the success of a session based on how quick they went or how they “felt”. We all like to be quick in training and feel amazing of course. It gives us comfort that we might be improving. But mostly – it just doesnt work that way. 

As I described in my Race Outcome Model there are so many more components to your race outcome than how quick you went. To give a few examples, this list is just a short sample of the things you can get out of a session : 

  • Mental strength 
  • Equipment choices
  • Adaptability
  • Pacing 
  • Nutrition (Pre, during and post session)
  • Strength up hills 
  • Technique 
  • Bike skills 
  • Coping with bad Weather 

Every single session is an opportunity to test yourself. It isn’t a race where you get an outcome. It is a series of mini challenges that you can test your skills and knowledge in. 

A few examples : 

  • TT’s…. A great chance to handle pre-race nerves. Good chance to see where your speed/endurance was at. How was your pacing? What equipment did you use? When you weren’t going as quick as you hoped how did you manage your mindset mid-TT? How did you justify it in your mind post-TT? 
  • Long ride ….. an athlete used the training opportunity to have a full dress rehearsal and found the wind knocked around their equipment preference of a rear disc and front 808. What a great outcome ! 
  • Another athlete was doing their long ride also in prep for an upcoming race and was turned around by a road closure. Mid-ride they had to adapt and overcome. Their run off was lonely, hot and hard. Just what the race will deliver and they got the opportunity to experience before the day. 

Your race outcome will definitely be dictated largely by your fitness. But it will also be dictated by many other things that you can prepare for. When you are reflecting on your sessions, think through what you learnt as well as how fast you went !!! 

“Managing” the heat

 

From a weather perspective this summer has been a challenging one. Heat and humidity really sucks it out of you at times and I have had to adjust intensity expectations more than a few times. We can drink all the electrolytes in the world and physically adjust, but in the end, the oppressive environmental factors means the Rating of Perceived Exertion punches up through the roof higher than we think. In that respect I’m pleased I can refer back to data and the data is speaking improvement on the whole despite basically feeling a bit rough from disturbed sleep and hot sessions. In raw terms, you might feel like rubbish but your improvement might not. Just adjust the correlation between “feelings” and “real”.

We can put this to good use of course. How many times does it happen that you experience heat in a race and it literally makes your feel like crap. You start to slow and readjust your personal expectations as to a result. Let’s use this time to practice holding pace and power while feeling the RPE climbing due to the heat. What can be a hardship can be a strategic cutting edge against your opposition. Turn it around and bring it in. Let’s face it, we still have at least a month to go of it.

T4 / T5

 

T5 – As a general rule if I prescribe T5 I will be looking for a top end level. It will have a long period of rest assigned to it also so you can have a good go at the intervals. At a minimum it will be 1:1 work:rest. When doing these have a real go and see if you can better your power / pace for that distance or length of interval. If you are doing a bike set on a smart trainer then switch “erg” off and rip in. I’d prefer you to see if you can set a new level and experience failure in the other reps than protect yourself and hold all reps at an even level.

T4 – this zone is all about race specificity and developing strength at that pace / power / heart rate over a period of time. Holding all intervals at the prescribed zone is the outcome I’ll be looking for is a full set at that level.

New Year

Notice I left the “Happy” bit off? I did that for a reason. It doesn’t have to be happy all the time. It can be sad too. It can be exciting, or fun, or challenging, or hard work, or any number of descriptions.

The new year is just another flip of the page. Another chance to commit to discipline and excellence and just not putting expectations on yourself other than through the process.

Change

 

I’ve been thinking deeply this past couple of weeks….. End of 2018 and all. Creativity and innovation is a big part of who I am as a coach and how I work. Pushing deeper into what works. This isn’t an easy task when the topic of individuality arises. It lays a different scenario over each training paradigm. But the one thing you always have to remember is that the basic foundations always work.

I’ve been doing a lot of reading and note-taking. I have a folder of work that I always read to remind me of the foundations. Swim coach Bill Sweetenham always provides a lot of inspiration as does my stuff from Jamie Turner. Then we have the coaching coffees with Mick Delamotte just talking endlessly about our athletes and experiences. All of it creating a picture.
“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.”

Buckminster Fuller
One thing that always happens with me in this type of innovation work is the “aha” moment where you see something that just resonates. The above quote is one such aha moment. I found it on Twitter of all things. Home of the quote. Joel Filliol presented it as a way of saying to his athletes “think different”. Don’t change. Rebuild yourself.

Buckminster Fuller was a pretty interesting guy. An architect with a passion for social issues, he was also an inventor. He invented the Geodesic dome infact in the early 1900’s. An architect who works in a world of designing buildings that are all the same has to think laterally for his breakthroughs.

The quote above for me is an epiphany of sorts. It reminds me that as a human working with other humans in the area of change that one has to think outside the box. Build the athlete that you need to get them to their goals.

I always say to athletes it’s not what you do it’s the way that you do it. Think differently. Step onto the training grounds with attitude and joy. Be a student of your game. Do what old mate Bucky Fuller suggests and don’t fight yourself.

Podcast 5 – An Interview with Matt Lester

In this podcast we chat with 5 year HPT athlete and Red Bull Defiance debutante Matt Lester. In the chat we discuss his background and what led him to this race, how he deals personally with fatigue and fear, and how he has prepared for his biggest challenge yet, the famed Red Bull Defiance race in Wanaka, New Zealand.

Written by Comments Off on Podcast 5 – An Interview with Matt Lester Posted in Podcast

Knowing

Telling us what’s wrong isn’t telling us what’s right.

Social media thrives on this. “The Hook”.  Tell em what’s wrong. Then say you know the answer.

Optimal Performance

Optimal performance derives from holistic wellbeing and knowing your identity and core motivations. Taking care of your wellbeing, allows you to function at your full potential

This is one of the biggest issues facing an adult athlete with big work and family responsibilities as well as the plethora of information pouring into your lives via social media. The way forward is backward. Peeling back some of the layers and placing an emphasis on who you are and what makes you tick will unlock a lot of answers for you and allow you to see training and racing in much purer light than just another achievement you are seeking. 

Behavioural Observations

Coaching is quite a personal thing. You have to really allow yourself in and commit 100% to the athletes you work with. It’s both demanding and rewarding. Sometimes – actually most times – you don’t know how you should deal with the stuff people go through. But as a coaching mate says “the only way out is in”.

This morning I wrote a post on Facebook. Not something I have done for a long time as I haven’t felt comfortable with that medium recently. On that post I wrote about the experiences one has as a coach. I literally see it all. The good, the bad and the ugly. It can be quite humbling and can absolutely distract you from what is happening.

What I have learnt is that with all the noise that seems to be in our way, the behaviours are what we should be looking at. Not what they are saying, but what they are doing. If I have but one piece of advice to give it is to not be distracted by words or stories. Observe the behaviours.